linux 安装android usb 驱动

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With an Android-powered device, you can develop and debug your Android applications just as you would on the emulator. Before you can start, there are just a few things to do:

1. Declare your application as “debuggable” in your Android Manifest.
When using Eclipse, you can skip this step, because running your app directly from the Eclipse IDE automatically enables debugging.
In the AndroidManifest.xml file, add android:debuggable=”true” to the element.
Note: If you manually enable debugging in the manifest file, be sure to disable it before you build for release (your published application should usually not be debuggable).

2. Turn on “USB Debugging” on your device.
On the device, go to Settings > Applications > Development and enable USB debugging (on an Android 4.0 device, the setting is located in Settings > Developer options).

3. Set up your system to detect your device.
If you’re developing on Windows, you need to install a USB driver for adb. For an installation guide and links to OEM drivers, see the OEM USB Drivers document.
If you’re developing on Mac OS X, it just works. Skip this step.
If you’re developing on Ubuntu Linux, you need to add a udev rules file that contains a USB configuration for each type of device you want to use for development. In the rules file, each device manufacturer is identified by a unique vendor ID, as specified by the ATTR{idVendor} property. For a list of vendor IDs, see USB Vendor IDs, below. To set up device detection on Ubuntu Linux:
Log in as root and create this file: /etc/udev/rules.d/51-android.rules.
Use this format to add each vendor to the file:
SUBSYSTEM==”usb”, ATTR{idVendor}==”0bb4″, MODE=”0666″, GROUP=”plugdev”

In this example, the vendor ID is for HTC. The MODE assignment specifies read/write permissions, and GROUP defines which Unix group owns the device node.
Note: The rule syntax may vary slightly depending on your environment. Consult the udev documentation for your system as needed. For an overview of rule syntax, see this guide to writing udev rules.
Now execute:
chmod a+r /etc/udev/rules.d/51-android.rules
When plugged in over USB, can verify that your device is connected by executing adb devices from your SDK platform-tools/ directory. If connected, you’ll see the device name listed as a “device.”

If using Eclipse, run or debug your application as usual. You will be presented with a Device Chooser dialog that lists the available emulator(s) and connected device(s). Select the device upon which you want to install and run the application.

If using the Android Debug Bridge (adb), you can issue commands with the -d flag to target your connected device.

USB Vendor IDs

This table provides a reference to the vendor IDs needed in order to add USB device support on Linux. The USB Vendor ID is the value given to the ATTR{idVendor} property in the rules file, as described above.

Company USB Vendor ID
Acer 0502
ASUS 0b05
Dell 413c
Foxconn 0489
Fujitsu 04c5
Fujitsu Toshiba 04c5
Garmin-Asus 091e
Google 18d1
Hisense 109b
HTC 0bb4
Huawei 12d1
K-Touch 24e3
KT Tech 2116
Kyocera 0482
Lenovo 17ef
LG 1004
Motorola 22b8
NEC 0409
Nook 2080
Nvidia 0955
OTGV 2257
Pantech 10a9
Pegatron 1d4d
Philips 0471
PMC-Sierra 04da
Qualcomm 05c6
SK Telesys 1f53
Samsung 04e8
Sharp 04dd
Sony 054c
Sony Ericsson 0fce
Teleepoch 2340
Toshiba 0930
ZTE 19d2

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